Have you ever stopped to think about the amount of sanitary towels and tampons used by a woman throughout her life?, do you know how long it takes to decompose one of these pads?, or what chemicals have tampons and pads to make them be so white, so “odourless”?

As you may have calculated the amount of waste generated is more than 10,000 disposable sanitary products in a lifetime. If we add that these items, their packaging, applicators and backing-strips takes over 300 years to degrade we can realize the enormous environmental impact that their use generates.

Concerning the chemicals we must name:

  • Dioxin, a chemical, used to bleach the fibers of tampons, that is cancer-causing and toxic.

  • Asbestos, which in addition to being cancer-causing increases, though it seems incredible, your bleeding.

  • Rayon, a super absorbent synthetic material that leaves fibres behind helping toxins accumulate inside your body and favoring, so, infections or the Toxic Shock Syndrome.

 

But, is there any ecological and healthy alternative for these basic goods? We must not forget that disposable sanitary products are a first world luxury. Women in many countries lack access to these goods, limiting their autonomy and independence. Girls in Kenya, for example, lose 20% of school attendance because they cannot afford sanitary towels during their period.

The answer is called menstrual cup or moon cup. A cup of soft silicone that is inserted into the vagina during menstruation to hold the flow. This could be considered the revolution on feminine hygiene articles, a widespread solution in other countries as a substitute for tampons and pads.

What makes it be a revolution? Which are its benefits?

  • For your wallet: One cup lasts, if cared for properly, for over 10 years, and costs the same as the average woman will spend on disposable sanitary protection in 3 months.

  • For your health: The cup is made of medical grade silicone; a stable material, 100% hypoallergenic, that does not alter your vaginal flora and is neither related to bacterial or fungal infections. However, the cup doesn’t prevent from the Toxic Shock Syndrome even if it is a rare complication.

  • For your planet: It avoids the huge amount of waste generated by the use of disposable pads and tampons.

  • For your comfort: Since nothing comes out of the vagina, you can wear any kind of underwear during menstruation as well as use it in any type of situation (sport activities, a dip in the pool, etc).

  • For your hygiene: Having no chemicals, the cup respect the natural balance of your vagina preventing the unpleasant odour associated with menstruation.

Our tips for switching to a menstrual cup:

  • Perseverance: The first time may seem difficult to insert it or remove it but after a bit of practice, you’ll see the process is very simple.

  • The cup on the go: The moon cup holds at least three times as much fluid as a tampon, giving longer lasting protection on heavier days. If, however, you need to empty it in public toilets where, at times, can be tricky rinse it, take a bottle of water with you or wipe the cup with a damp cloth or toilet paper, since the silicone cleans easily.

  • Another alternative: Although part of us, some women may have apprehension to blood and see the use of the cup as something uncomfortable. Others, on the other hand, may experience leaking at the beginning, with heavy periods or when doing extreme activities. The solution, in these cases, will be the use of reusable organic cotton pads.

 

How do I use it?

We invite you to visit our e-shop where you can fin a large range of menstrual cups and washable pads for and eco-firendly and healthy perdiod!